Category Archives: celiac

That Endoscopy Thing We Did.

If you are a die hard Deceivingly Normal follower you’ll already know that our dear Bean has suffered for a long time (from the age of 4) with GI issues, tooth enamel defects, low weight gain and bad sleeps leading to, but not totally guilty of, extremely dark circles under her eyes.

If you are not a die hard follower – than you can catch up here.

In any event: We suspected Celiac.

We pushed for a biopsy to be done, even with the risks of false negative results. Her GI doctor agreed, but only if there was a change on her blood test results. The change could be minute, it could still read negative by medical standards, but it had to be there. She didn’t want to put Bean through a procedure for nothing. I understood but this was awful. Not only was she clearly affected physically by consuming gluten (she was on the “gluten challenge”), but no matter how long she stayed on that damn gluten challenge, her blood results never differed. She never showed any positive antibodies to say she might have Celiac. We even tested her for an IgA deficiency that would cause her to be showing false negative results, but alas she did not have it. In other words, she was only showing physical signs of a gluten intolerance, but her medical results claimed different.

Blood test after blood test on my anxiety ridden kiddo, and nothing to help us get to the next step. I was becoming frustrated and impatient. Convinced I was right, but feeling like an overprotective and paranoid mom at the exact same time. In fact, exactly as I had felt when Bear was ill with T1D and I knew something wasn’t right, but continued to doubt my instincts.

We had her give blood every 6 months to test for those damn antibodies that might indicate that she might have CD. She was clearly ill, I might go as far as to say deteriorating in health (her teeth which had once improved were worse now, her eyes darker, her sleep worse, she began to get headaches daily) she wasn’t giving the Doctors what they wanted to see there was no good reason to validate the need for a biopsy.

Back to the books (internet) I went. More research, more sleepless nights finding the information I needed to get my child properly tested. I had done this once before with Pups. When she was diagnosed with Guttate Psoriasis. I had researched it till I discovered a woman who had “cured” herself of this painful full body rash by having her tonsils removed. I took my evidence to the hospital and got them to remove Pups tonsils (no, not on the spot).

And guess what? It worked.

My child was suffering, I was good at research, so I researched, and I found this:

Some patients test negative for celiac disease and turn out years later upon repeat testing to have celiac disease. Repeating your blood test may be an important first step. Some individuals also take advantage of genetic testing to determine whether or not they have certain HLA DQ genes that are necessary for developing celiac disease. If you do not have these HLA DQ genes, your symptoms are likely related to a condition other than celiac disease. The HLA DQ genes associated with celiac disease are present in up to one third of the population, so the tests are only helpful in excluding celiac disease as a diagnosis.”

I decided to get Bean’s DNA tested to find out if it was even possible for her to have Celiac. It was.

Determined to follow through with my instincts. I brought a folder full of evidence to show that Bean had more than just a slight chance of having CD and I demanded (asked really strongly) that we give her an endoscopy. The doctor agreed relunctantly. Even going as far as to tell me of a little boy who had complications due to a simple endoscopy being done. With a big gulp and butterflies (not the good kind) in my belly I ‘neverminded’ it and pushed ahead. I knew I was making the right choice.

We were booked for the endoscopy and awaited the date.

Bean was nervous, of course. And so was I. When we got to the hospital the doctor who was going to do the procedure came in to speak with me. Like Bean’s GI doc he too lectured me on the unlikelihood that this endoscopy would show any signs of Celiac in a child whose blood tests had all come back negative. He looked down on me (seriously, he was standing above me – I was sitting on the bed with the Bean) and his eyes read “Lady, this is not going to turn out the way you hope it will”. Which was totally useful at that moment in time seeing as Bean was two minutes from going into the room to get the endoscopy done.

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When we were left alone, after all the many different visits from all the different nurses and doctors and residents performing studies they wanted to know if we wanted to be a part of, Bean just sat quietly in my lap and held my hands tightly.

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I don’t get a lot of these moments, so I cherished it for exactly what it was.

Finally the time came for her to go in. They let me join her and hold her while they sedated her. She sobbed and screamed and panicked and then, like a light – she was out.

Afterwards, while she was coming out of it and recovering, the doctor came in with an “I told you so” look about him and said that everything looked normal but that we would get the results of the biopsy in 4 to 6 weeks. Glad it was over with I let out a big sigh of relief. At least now I could say I tried everything. And now that it had gone so well, and was such a short procedure (I’m talking 10 minutes) I knew we could do it again in a few years to come if we felt we had to.

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Two days ago we got a call from Bean’s GI doctor. The results were in.

You guessed it – she has Celiac.

Now we are working out exactly what that means. Other than the obvious – gluten free – we also need to get a separate chopping board for her food to make sure there isn’t any cross contamination. We need to figure out how much we tell people…do we announce it to her class so that the kids don’t share food with her? We need to figure out if gluten free toothpaste and shampoo is something she should have or if it is just one of those marketing schemes for the gluten free gullibles…and we need to throw her into this and hope that she will not cheat at school.

So, on we trudge. The family with the best chance of earning the “most amount of invisible conditions in one household” award (if it existed).

Shit, does that exist? Cause we could use an award right about now.

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Filed under Asperger's, celiac, diabetes, diabetes and illness, diagnosed, Uncategorized

ASD and Type 1 Diabetes. The case of the really shitty school.

Once, while rushing off to work from dropping my kids off at school I was called a “bad mom” by one of the staff because I wasn’t standing still for the National Anthem. I was shocked. I reported the incident to the principle because a teacher should never be allowed to treat a parent that way. Instead of apologizing to me for his staff’s immature and inappropriate behaviour, the principle defended her saying that we must all stand still for the National Anthem.

That should have been my first clue as to how awful a school this was. Treating adults, nay parents, like children they can lecture and insult should have been enough of an insight as to how they must treat the actual children at that school.

But I let it go. Never thinking that this Principle’s attitude towards the parents of the school (or at least to me) might reflect how he and his staff cared for the students of the school, namely mine.

That was back when Pups was still going there. And luckily for her she was not a child with special needs. She was of above average intelligence, kind, good natured, calm and easy going. And…it appears, that is the only type of students that this school can deal well with. Or, I guess, does not really have to deal with at all.

When Bean started attending the school I thought (wrongly) that it would be as good an experience as Pups had had. Alas I was mistaken. Adding to the pot some ADHD and Autism created a school environment that I was not expecting, nor was prepared to contend with. I didn’t make very many right moves. I allowed myself to be convinced by the administration of the school that they were doing all that they could to work and care for my child in order to help her succeed.

They lied. Or at least, they did not follow through.

What little they did do I thought was a lot. That was until I started to do my own research on the school board and its responsibilities in so far as special needs are concerned. I was shocked and even ashamed to discover that the school was doing the most minimal amount required to help and nurture my child, if even that. I started to become “that parent”. The parent that always had another complaint and request. The parent that was always in the office looking to speak with the principle or VP. I was the parent they tried to avoid. The parent that never left anything alone.

I was the parent without blinders on anymore. I was my child’s advocate.

One would assume that I was enough of a pain in the ass that the school staff would learn not to screw with me. That at the very least, THE VERY LEAST, they would make sure that I was appeased, my children properly cared for, in order to keep me quiet. They are either not that smart or truly don’t care about the well being of their students. I’m thinking they are a bit from column A and the rest from column B.

And this was when they were dealing with Autism.

Sorry, “Asperger’s”.

If the child isn’t non-verbal apparently the school doesn’t seem to recognize it as actually being part of the autism spectrum, at least not “really autistic”. This was told to me by one of the head admin for the school.

This school originally denied Bean’s ADHD, they denied her AS. Even after formal diagnoses were brought in as proof they consistently told me what was AS and what wasn’t. They rejected my request for her teachers to be more sensitive to her conditions, especially her anxiety disorder. They were inconsiderate when it came to her suspected Celiac and diet restrictions – and that’s putting it mildly. They manipulated me in order to avoid giving her psycho-educational and cognitive assessments done. The numerous psychiatrists we saw for Bean had forewarned me that the school would attempt everything in their power to not assess Bean for any LD’s (learning dissibilities) she may have in order to save costs.

And then, as if all that wasn’t enough, I sent Bear (newly diagnosed with T1D) to that school.

I guess I thought that Autism was one thing, but a disease in which one depended on life sustaining meds was another. Perhaps all had gone badly with Bean because the school, the staff, truly saw a different kid then the one we knew. Perhaps their experience with AS in girls was limited or non existent. I convinced myself that although the issues with Bean were many, were constant, were not acceptable…that those issues would not fall on to Bear. Because Bear had diabetes, Type 1 Diabetes. A chronic disease. An autoimmune disorder. A condition that required, as mentioned, LIFE SUSTAINING MEDICATION. 

Nope. All of that didn’t make a difference. The administration wasn’t taking his condition seriously, or they weren’t thinking of the implications it would have on them if he was hurt because of their refusal to care for him properly. So I wrote them a letter in hopes of bettering the care of the next child they encountered with Diabetes. In hopes that they would now know how to respond to the issues a student with T1D faces efficiently, safely, responsibly.

At the end of the letter I attached forms and documents that I encouraged the administration to read up on.

This did nothing.

This school that Bean and Bear attended had finally reached its limit of irresponsibility and neglect for me. I wish I could say “fool me once shame on you, fool me twice shame on me”, but in this instance it’s more like “fool me over and over again till I don’t know what else to do and I finally start looking for a way out”.

Shame on me.

This lack of proper care and smudging of the rights of my children at that school was astounding. And although I blame myself for letting so much of it happen without educating myself on my children’s rights – this school proved time and time again that it was not the right place for my children. 

I really am saddened by this. I hoped my kids could go to a school close to our home. I hoped that this school would support my children and care for them.

In the end the best choice, the safest choice, was to remove my children from that environment. To hopefully find a school that will see them as sweet and smart kids who also happen to need a bit of extra care – and not see them as just another burden with a really bitchy mom.

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Filed under ADHD, ASD is more than what you see, Asperger's, Aspergirls, autism, celiac, death, diabetes, diabetes and illness, diagnosed, Dyspraxia, education, ipad, Motor Praxis, Sensory Processing Disorder

High Functioning Autism: The Curse Of The Double Edged Sword

In my absence from blogging I’ve been dealing. 

Dealing with Diabetes. 

Dealing with Autism. 

Dealing with BPD and GAD.

Dealing with a teenager with GAD.

Yeah, I’ve been “dealing”…or perhaps not dealing so well. But at the very least – trying.
Restart > In my absence from blogging I’ve been trying.

Bean is stressed as we are all stressed. She’s scared and confused and hurt, as  we all are in this trying time. If it isn’t enough that our lives have been turned upside down by the diabetes, and the “gluten challenge”, we recently found out she has (all school year) been neglected and treated without any consideration or regard for her dietary restrictions, autism or ADHD by her teacher. That she feels different and the explanation of Asperger’s isn’t quite cutting it. She needs more than just a name to encompass it all. She needs understanding from her peers and the adults in her life and she needs to be able to create her own way to deal with her surroundings and function within the society we have laid out for her.

To add to her feelings of exclusion over the course of the school year Bean has, several times, been left out without any care or consideration for her feelings, because her teacher (I’ll refer to her as ‘Mrs. Twit’) has given everybody candy in the classroom, or hot chocolate, but nothing to her because of her food intolerances. This would be great if it were a matter of Bean not being able to eat anything good ever. But Bean can eat substitutes for the treats her class mates are having and I have stated and stressed on numerous occasions that if I’m informed of the class treat I will bring in a suitable replacement for Bean so she can partake.

Then I had the challenge of trying to get Mrs. Twit to communicate with me via agenda about Bean’s studies (or lack there of). Nothing. No matter how many times I requested communication between Mrs. Twit and I, I received nothing in return. What was she learning? Was she learning anything at all? I realized the most education she was getting was through the educational apps that I had on our ipad. More then that, I saw that she liked learning on the ipad. A huge feat since getting her to do any homework was like pulling teeth. So we spoke with the school about having us invest in an iPad mini for her to bring to school in order to improve her marks. I explained that she works amazingly on ipads and computers (as most kids with Asperger’s do) and that I was sure that if she could work on an ipad in class we would see a huge change in regards to her love of school and most definitely in her grades.

I was met with “well I don’t know how that will work – after all, we have to follow the curriculum and iPad’s only have games on them, not work sheets…”. Well first off ipads don’t only have games on them…but YES, that’s exactly why it will work for Bean I thought. Math and spelling “games”can help Bean to learn. I asked if they don’t agree then with using iPads in this school – “Oh no!” she said “we love the use of ipads for our students” and then, and you’ll love this part, she added: “but Bean…well you know, she isn’t really what I would call “autistic”, I know you say she is, I mean, I know she is, but ipads are for children with severe autism. I mean like non-verbal autism.” “You mean ‘classic autism’?” I asked. “YES!” she responded, as if I had just saved them from digging themselves further in. “For those who ‘really’ need it.”

So, here is my daughter, D-streaming grade three. It is obvious she is not learning anything. Grade three is officially a bust. Yet they are pushing her through. Sweeping her issues under the rug so that these LD’s they claim she has will eventually be somebody else’s problem. I can only assume it is because they can. As long as she can “get by” they will continue to impose on her an immense amount of “accommodations” and one on one time without actually helping her to learn how to learn and how to take that knowledge to improve and succeed in her future endeavours. All this, but that doesn’t qualify a need for her to perhaps be considered a better method to help her learn? An ipad that would most certainly advance her learning and her grade level.

Is it because it would seem unfair to the other students? Do I give a shit?

I couldn’t be bothered to go over proving how Bean is autistic, partly because I am so sick and tired of the ignorance I am spewed every day by people like this who put Bean into a slot of: not problematic towards the school and classroom, therefore not in real need of help or care. But also because there is no one part of Bean that *is* autistic. I can’t divvy her up into “normal parts” and “autistic parts”.

She *is* autistic. This is her normal.

No, she doesn’t have “Classic Autism”, that’s true. Ya got me there.

She has Aspergers. Or, by the new DSM V standards she has ASD level 1. And no matter how many people want to fool themselves into thinking that Asperger’s is actually not a form of autism, or that it is so mild it really doesn’t count, they will never be right.

Just as Classic Autism is a “form” of autism, so too is Asperger’s, so too is PDD-NOS (atypical autism). Call it what you want, believe what you want – it is what it is.

I shouldn’t have to prove her ASD to anyone, certainly not the school. They have her diagnosis in hand and that should most definitely be enough for her to access the right resources.

So I complained. Not just about how Bean wasn’t even being considered for the use of an iPad, but for how many times I have requested the teacher simply communicate with me what Bean is doing in the classroom so that I could try to help her improve those skills at home. About the pile of homework sheets that have built up over the past few months on my desk that the teacher hasn’t even bothered to inquire about.

A pile!!

Is this teacher just going through the motions over there? Not actually checking to see if the kids are completing their work? Or is Bean just the lucky one whose homework doesn’t really count for anything? I wouldn’t be surprised. Without trying to sound too harsh about Bean’s teacher I’ll just say she’s a woman lacking in the capacity to think logically, to consider others, to listen to parents, and to be sensitive to special needs or to educate her students effectively. My complaints (after a really baaaaad meeting with Mrs. Twit where I left yelling “screw you”, but not before slamming my hand down on the table hard and yelling at Mrs. Twit that she is to NEVER bully my child again – oh yeah, that happened) I was invited to meet with the VP and the Superintendent to figure this all out.

I admit, the meeting with the Super and the VP was a positive one where we all agreed that this past year with Mrs. Twit has been a bust. And that Bean’s education will never be sacrificed for the idiocy of a teacher, this teacher, again. Not under my watch. Bean is now allowed the use of an iPad, and I will be sitting in on a class to make sure she is able to use it and follow the curriculum.

I read a tweet the other day that so aptly put the trials and tribulations of people on the spectrum:

“If you are high functioning they don’t see your deficits, if you are low functioning they don’t see your strengths.”

This is more than just parenting, this is a fight for her deserved rights and education. I will never walk blindly again hoping that it will all somehow work out – because it must, right? Apparently life doesn’t actually work out that way. Who knew?

I see now that I must keep my eyes open, that I am her first advocate and her strongest advocate. I will walk in front of her to show her the path and the ways. And hopefully she will become her own self-advocate. I know she will. She is strong and smart and unique. It might be tough right now, it might always be tough, but even when I pass her the torch for good and she is in complete charge of her life – I’ll be there to hold her hand when she needs it, or pass her that piece of gum when things get a bit too tough to handle.

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Doing some work on the ipad – in a trunk – of course.

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Filed under ADHD, Asperger's, Aspergirls, Aspie raising an Aspie, autism, celiac, diabetes, diagnosed, Dyspraxia, Motor Praxis, Sensory Processing Disorder, strength, Transition

Celiac, you’re breaking my heart.

I’m not sure what I’m running on these days. Is it possible to run on pure stress and get by ok?
If so, that’s me.
Add to our plate of Asperger’s, T1D we are now seriously looking into the possibility of Celiac Disease as the reason behind Bean’s GI issues.
Seriously.

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It has been mentioned in a previous post that Bean is gluten and casein free. Or at least, she was until a few weeks ago. She is scheduled for a biopsy to determine if she has Celiac, so > in order to have accurate results > we must put her on a “gluten challenge“. Essentially making sure that there is damage done, “enough damage” to be able to find atrophied villi in her small intestine. It is as if, or maybe ‘exactly’, like we are starving her from nutrition in order to have a clear answer of the problem so that we no longer starve her from nutrition anymore. Say that 5 times fast.

It takes an average of 9 to 11 years to be diagnosed as someone with Celiac.

I am not kidding. That’s a real statistic.

9 to 11 years to get diagnosed.

People with Celiac are said to be diagnosed with everything under the sun but Celiac – until – after about a decade when it seems like that is the only thing left to try out. And, after about that long people with Celiac have sometimes caused so much damage to their small intestines that they are prone to a number of other diseases and ailments, including – but not limited to – osteoporosis, infertility and cancer. And, in the worst cases (cases that go undiagnosed or untreated for too long), it is possible that people can die from the other ailments/diseases that have come about from having Celiac disease. Yes, Celiac can lead to death if left untreated. Morbid, but true.

Bean has been showing symptoms, now that I know what the symptoms are, for as long as I can remember. From colic, projectile vomiting and short stature (in the lower 5th percentile) as a baby to severe constipation, dark blueish circles under her eyes, poor weight gain, enamel damage to her adult teeth and weak bones (elbow dislocated twice, and shattered once) as a child.

I’ll admit that in this time I have allowed her to have dairy again. Firstly because I’m not positive that she is actually casein intolerant, secondly – because if you are already going to suffer, you might as well be eating yummy food while you do it.

Part of the reason I am suspicious of her casein intolerance is because of the Hemocode test that she underwent. In the foods that she was tolerant of, there was the word: casein. Now I knew that since Bean had not been consuming dairy for quite a while it might have given us a false negative result since the protein was not in her system for the test to find it either tolerant or intolerant, but in the ‘Severely Intolerant’ list, there were things like ‘kamut’ and ‘rye’, of which I was pretty sure she had never consumed. There is also the controversy over whether these IgG tests are actually accurate or simply a sham. At that point in our life, with everything we had been through with Bean,, in as far as GI issues were concerned, we felt we had to take the $420.00 chance that it wasn’t a sham and that it might unveil some answers..

If Bean does prove to be Celiac, and dairy doesn’t affect her negatively, I will no longer wonder if i wasted $420 that day. But I will wish I had known more about celiac then so that I might have taken those results to mean more then just ‘intolerance’ (which, to be honest, at the time I felt wasn’t *that* serious an issue, whether true or not).

With all that said, it wasn’t till we were sitting in the emergency department with Bear the night he was diagnosed with T1D and they asked me almost immediately if any of our other children had celiac that I had given it much other thought. And in fact, to be completely honest, it wasn’t till their next question “…or any other autoimmune disease?” that I started to connect the dots. Yes, Pups has Guttate Psoriasis I said. And then, as if a light bulb went on above my head like some cartoon character: “and actually Bean is highly suspected of Celiac, but she’s had blood taken and the results were negative, even with all the other symptoms present”. Oh, said the doctor as she jotted it down on her piece of paper. And then: “we will have Bear tested for celiac since her has T1D. The two are highly correlated. It doesn’t mean he has it, but we will check as a precaution.” And now it was my turn: “oh.” I responded, feeling a brief moment of both “ah hah!’ and “oh fuck” when re-thinking celiac and what it might mean to our family.

So I began to research, as I do. I found that yes, T1D and Celiac are very similar autoimmune disorders. They both carry the genetic markers HLA DQ2 and DQ8. If you have celiac, you should be tested for T1D, and the same is true if you have T1D > you should be tested for celiac. There was even some evidence to suggest that if you found out you had celiac early enough and treated it properly and immediately – you might even be able to avoid developing T1D in the future.

So here we were, knowing (by internet research ‘chance’, and not by doctor related information given) that the autoimmune disorder that Pups has (Guttate Psoriasis) can be linked to Celiac, and that Bean’s suspected Celiac Disease, or ‘CD’, (which, we were now aware of because of the Dr in emerg) is actually an autoimmune disorder, and of course that Bear’s T1D is also an autoimmune disorder and can also be linked to Celiac in many cases. There was also a suspected, but unproven, link between people with an ASD and/or ADHD and Celiac. The symptoms related with Celiac were all too evident in Bean. From her serious GI issues and positive reaction to a mostly gluten free diet right down to her AS and ADHD diagnoses. Immediately I decided that something more had to be done to see if she had Celiac Disease. Another blood test (already in the works from before Bear’s diagnosis) revealed yet another negative result. But as Bear now had T1D, and blood tests with Celiac have proven to be unreliable in the past in correlation with false negatives, Bean’s paediatrician and I decided it had to be time for a proper test, a biopsy. As mentioned, even this test would appear as a false negative if not enough gluten was present in her system to do actual damage to her villi. So on to the gluten challenge we went. And that is when we started to see things like obvious defects in her teeth enamel and dark blueish circles under her eyes. She became lethargic and moody (more than usual). She was absolutely and obviously very ill.

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So…more research later, I came upon a celiac home test kit. What the!?

That seems way too easy.

Since it was proven to be as accurate as the blood tests taken in hospital (and approved by Health Canada), and seeing as Bean had now been on her gluten challenge for 4 weeks, I decided to try it out. Maybe, I hoped, it would show a positive result and I could use that result to push Bean’s biopsy date up – especially as she was already so sick because of the gluten.

I did the test.

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Results used in a study to see if nurses could judge the positive tests correctly. All these test were positive, the nurses only thought the darkest result line showed a positive result.

Here was our celiac home test result (which, incidentally, was much clearer at the pharmacy when we brought it in to have it checked by a pharmacist):

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Do you see what I see? (<-Why do I always add a tune to that?)

The line is SO faint, it is practically not there.

Except that it is.

The hub and I thought that what we were seeing was just the test strip’s positive line reacting to any liquid wetting it. But still, the pamphlet specifically said “no matter how faint”. Could it actually mean *this* faint!? I had to know. The pharmacist assured us that this was a positive test. Saying that absolutely NO LINE, nothing, would appear if it wasn’t detecting the celiac disease.

I am of two minds about this. Wishing that Bean won’t have Celiac (of course), while wishing that her test is positive because of knowing that she very likely does > and hoping for a final and absolute confirmation.

Celiac is another challenge to add to our plate, to be sure. An expensive, vague, and chronic disease type of challenge that will undoubtedly lead to yet more grey hairs on this overwhelmed mumma’s head. But as only a biopsy will really absolutely truly give us confirmation about whether Bean in fact does have Celiac (and only if that biopsy is positive, because a negative biopsy actually doesn’t rule out celiac! I shit you not) then we must trudge forward through this gluten challenge diet and hope that it is not all for naught. At least if positive we will have a solution, however challenging, (and possibly difficult) to Bean’s painful GI issues so that we can finally start to work towards healing her body.

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Filed under ADHD, ASD is more than what you see, Asperger's, Aspergirls, autism, celiac, death, diabetes, diagnosed, disclosure, leaky gut, Sensory Processing Disorder, strength, Transition